We strive to provide the most modern and affordable healthcare

We strive to provide the most modern and affordable healthcare

We provide generalist, emergency and diagnostic veterinary services in both Japanese and English to cater for both the Japanese and international communities in Tokyo

We provide generalist, emergency and diagnostic veterinary services in both Japanese and English to cater for both the Japanese and international communities in Tokyo

We offer consultations with our specialists to meet the needs of you and your pet

We offer consultations with our specialists to meet the needs of you and your pet

Our clinic and team provides a comfortable, caring and compassionate environment

Our clinic and team provides a comfortable, caring and compassionate environment

We endeavor to create a warm and caring environment for you to build strong bonds with your neighborhood vet

We endeavor to create a warm and caring environment for you to build strong bonds with your neighborhood vet

We strive to provide the most modern and affordable healthcare

We strive to provide the most modern and affordable healthcare

We provide generalist, emergency and diagnostic veterinary services in both Japanese and English to cater for both the Japanese and international communities in Tokyo

We supply a range of services, in Japanese and English, for local and international communities

We offer consultations with our specialists to meet the needs of you and your pet

We offer consultations with our specialists to meet the needs of you and your pet

Our clinic and team provides a comfortable, caring and compassionate environment

Our clinic and team provides a comfortable, caring and compassionate environment

We endeavor to create a warm and caring environment for you to build strong bonds with your neighborhood vet

We endeavor to create a warm and caring environment for you to build strong bonds with your neighborhood vet

Welcome to PetLifeEnglish speaking vet in the heart of Tokyo

Information

2018/06/20
Official App Please check out PetLife Veterinary Clinic’s official app!
2018/03/27
Rabies vaccines for 2018 available now Dog owners in Japan are required by law to register their dog and vaccinate them once a year (between April and June). If available, please bring the vaccination notice sent from the ward office when visiting the clinic.
2018/03/27
Spring inoculation season is just around the corner! PetLife has prepared a health check package to help your pet start the prevention season healthy and happy!
Please inquire about vaccinations, heartworm prevention, and flea/tick prevention.
Contact & Reservation 03-6807-4058
More info
2018/03/14
PetLife Veterinary Clinic has opened for business (March 6th)! More info

About us

Your family vet in the heart of Tokyo PetLife Veterinary Clinic is a friendly and caring clinic in the heart of Tokyo.
We provide a bilingual (Japanese/English) service for both domestic and international communities.
We are experienced veterinarians with many years serving families
and individuals and their pets using the latest technology. We have a compassionate
and welcome approach and aim to nurture close bonds within the local community.

Hours of Operation

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun・Holiday
9:30〜12:30 ×
12:30〜16:00 ×
16:00〜19:00 ×

Reservation Only

Surgery, Procedures, House calls

*Please inquire about consultations for your pet outside regular hours.

Pets

Consultations are available for both cats and dogs at PetLife.

Our services

Our Facilities

Introduction of medical equipment

Team

PetLife Tips

October 17th, 2018Evacuation with your pet in an emergency
Earthquakes and typhoons have wreaked havoc in Japan since the start of 2018.
There is a fear that the next natural disaster will hit the Kanto region including central Tokyo.
Here are some tips to prepare our furry family members as well, should such a disaster happen.

Stockpile

★Have all your pet’s information in one place (ex. In a file or notebook)
When taking shelter with your pet, some facilities will require documentation such as vaccination certificates.
Here are some examples of information you should keep with you:
1. Basic information about your pet – Name, color, markings, character. A photo would be helpful.
2 Registration at your ward of residence: Don’t forget to put the little license plate the ward provides on your dog’s collar.
3 Microchip information – Have your pet’s microchip number jotted down so that you can provide it to the authorities in case he/she goes missing.
4 Vaccination certificates – If you are postponing your pet’s vaccination for some reason, have your vet issue an exemption certificate in the meantime.
5 Medical history – Jot down the name of your vet, your pet’s medical history, current treatment and medicines.
It would also help to have any blood test or health check data on your phone in case reference is needed in an emergency.

★Food, treats, and water. 5 days’ worth at least
In an emergency, humans won’t be the only ones panicking!
Because shelter life may be stressful for your pet, it is a good idea to be able to give them food, treats, favorite toy/blanket that they are used to and remind them of home.

★Medicine
If your pet has a chronic illness (heart disease, skin disease, etc), running out of or not having access to medication can lead to worsening of symptoms and in some cases even be life threatening.
Placing your pet’s medication where you have easy access to them on your way out when evacuating is a good idea. Also, knowing what kind of meds and the dosage will be handy if a vet is on call at the shelter to prescribe a new batch.

★Extra food bowls, leashes and collars.

★Toilet equipment (wee mats and kitty litter)

★Cardboard boxes, tape, towels – just in case you need to build your pet a temporary cage at the shelter.

☆Additional advice

① Having extra pet food at home at all times in case of such emergencies is a good idea.
When you open a new bag of food, buy another.
That way you never have to worry about expiry dates!
② When packing for your pet, don’t buy new things.
Always pack things they know and have used all their lives.
This applies to everything from food and treats, to towels, blankets and pet crates.
Familiar things and smells can do wonders to ease your pet’s stress.
Of course we need to prepare well for human evacuation, but being able to evacuate your pet with you and be prepared to do it is also important.
At shelters, shortage of supplies even or humans can be problematic, and most of the time there are not enough resources to take into account the distribution of pet supplies.
We can help our pets through such crises by doing the best we can to be prepared.

Stay tuned for next month’s edition, where we will share some information about evacuation drills☆
April 11st, 2018Taking your dog out for walks
For dogs, a walk is not just an event meant for going to the toilet. Outdoors, there is a whole other world full of exciting things that your dog would not experience at home. For example the smell of grass, the smell of concrete, other dogs, cars, and bicycles. There may even be a big truck or motorcycle speeding by startling your dog with their loud engine noise.
Exposure to any of these stimulants is a precious new experience for your pet, and must be taken advantage of as a good socialization tool.
When taking your dog outside, be sure to put on a leash (two if possible; one on the collar and one on the harness), and to not let him/her stray too far. Carrying your dog when walking through unfamiliar places may also help. There will be many things that your dog will display an interest in outdoors, but the trick is to try to get your dog to focus on you (the owner) as much as possible so that accidents such as your dog running out onto the road suddenly or eating strange things of the ground may be avoided. For training purposes, having a treat in your hand that you use only when going outside, is a good idea. Hold the treat in your left hand and let your dog have a sniff as you walk. After walking a few meters, stop, give your dog a command “sit” “wait” and then give him/her the treat when he/she obeys. If there is something on your walk route that your dog always reacts to (barks at, or is afraid of), using this treat technique specifically at these spots will help your dog overcome any anxieties.

For dogs that tend to pull on the leash and try to take you in the direction they want to go, the trick is to not let them lead you, but to pull your dog in the direction you want to go, to make sure he/she knows that you are in charge.
By taking it one step at a time, and helping your dog learn, he/she will come to naturally acquire the ability to adapt to his/her surroundings in any situation.
March 6th, 2018How far do we go to train our pets?
I’m sure we have all experienced bizarre behavior from our pet or behavior that seems like they are doing something with the sole purpose of annoying us. Sometimes this behavior makes us miserable, and other times we think it is endearing. How our pet’s behavior affects us depends on our (the owners) state of mind, and there may be some pet owners that go so far as to think that any kind of behavior, whether it is problematic or not, is adorable and will not result in any need for discipline. So where do we draw the line and intervene? Basically, the decision should be based on whether both parties (animal and human) are enjoying life with each other, and on whether the “problematic” behavior is causing a third party any inconvenience.
If your pet is enjoying himself/herself, but the behavior is causing you a huge amount of stress, discipline is necessary. This logic works both ways. You may be enjoying life with your pet in a way you feel is appropriate, but your pet, depending on how you have trained or disciplined him/her, may feel restrained and stressed. Another important thing to think about is that you and your pet are not causing those around you any inconvenience. The extent of training or discipline you apply to your pet should be based on your (and your family’s) lifestyle. It is important, however, to bear in mind that “Give & Take +Manners” are key ingredients when it comes to enjoying life with your pet to the fullest.
In our next issue, we will give you some specific examples to help you get a better idea of how to, and how far to, train your pet.
If you have specific questions regarding training for your pet, please contact us at info@petlife.co.jp

Access

PetLife Veterinary Clinic

PetLife Veterinary Clinic 1F. Daiichi Bldg.
2-3-5 Higashi Azabu
Minato-ku
Tokyo 106-0044
TEL:03-6807-4058
*Emergency after hours inquiries will be forwarded to the veterinarian’s mobile telephone.

Akabanebashi St. Nakanohashi Exit, 5 min Walk
Azabu juban St. Exit 6, 8 min Walk

Contact us

Parking Information

  • 1.Times Higashiazabu Dai15 2 Chome-3 Higashiazabu, Minato, Tokyo 106-0044
    Tel:0120-778-924
  • 2.Ecolo Park Higashiazabu Dai4 1 Chome-4-3 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:03-5457-1190
  • 3.Kato Parking Lot 1 Chome-8-9 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
  • 4.Park NET Higashiazabu 1-chome Parking Lot 1 Chome-13-7 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
  • 5.Seiwa Parking Avenir Higashiazabu 1 Chome-13 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:03-5457-1190
  • 6.TOMO parking Higashiazabu 1 Chome-12-4 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:0120-418-909
  • 7.Clearth Park Palace Duo Azabu East 1 Chome-12 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:03-5457-1190
  • 8.Repark Higashiazabu 1-chome 2 Chome-28-1 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:0120-325-130
  • 9.Repark Higashiazabu 1-chome Dai5 東京都港区東麻布1-19
    Tel:0120-325-130
  • 10.Parking 1 Chome-19 Higashiazabu, Minato, Tokyo 106-0044
  • 11.Ecolo Park Higashiazabu Dai2 1 Chome-17-16 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:03-5457-1190
  • 12.Repark Higashiazabu 2-chome 2 Chome-28-1 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:0120-325-130
  • 13.Times Higashi-Azabu #12 2 Chome-22 Higashiazabu, Minato, Tokyo 106-0044
    Tel:0120-778-924
  • 14.Coin Park
  • 15.Higashiazabu 2-chome park 2 Chome-5-5 Higashiazabu, Minato-ku, Tōkyō-to 106-0044
    Tel:0120-895-889

Registration

事業所の名称 ペットライフ動物病院
事業所の所在地 東京都港区東麻布二丁目3番5号 第一ビル1階
登録番号 保管 17東京都保第005774号
登録年月日 平成30年3月1日
登録の有効期間の末日 平成35年2月28日
動物取扱責任者の氏名 木下菜穂子